Resource Results:

Showing results 1 - 14 for
  • Free, easy-to-use activities and curriculum introduce students ages 9-14 to computer science through themed projects that attract students with varied interests. Instructional videos guide students through each activity, so no coding experience is needed to teach!

    Resource Type:
    Lesson plans & activities
  • This program is based on Google’s CS First Music & Sound club curriculum and has been customized by Homer (AK) Public Library for a week-long coding camp to introduced kids ages 8-11 to basic computer science concepts while they create digital music, sound and video. Library staff worked with a music educator to deliver the program content.

    Resource Type:
    Lesson plans & activities
  • Two characters meet in a world and discover a surprising object. What happens next? It’s all up to students, who have the opportunity to use their imagination and creativity to code their own story.

    Resource Type:
    Lesson plans & activities
  • This self-paced course helps educators learn about computational thinking and how it can be integrated into a variety of subject areas. Divided into five units, the course provides real world examples as well as supplemental readings to support your learning.

    Resource Type:
    Professional development, Tutorial, Website
  • Youth can learn about farming and coding as they use the app to control a FarmBot as it plants, waters, and weeds a raised bed garden plot that they can then design and implement in the community!

    Resource Type:
    Lesson plans & activities
  • Written by two school librarians, this book provides ideas for physical builds and coding, for new and reluctant coders, that are easily achieved by middle school and high school aged youth.

    Resource Type:
    Books & magazines, Lesson plans & activities
  • This self-paced course helps educators learn about computational thinking and how it can be integrated into a variety of subject areas. Divided into five units, the course provides real world examples as well as supplemental readings to support your learning.

    Resource Type:
    Professional development, Tutorial, Website
  • Susan P. Baier, Director of McCracken County Public Library, writes about community engagement as a key focus of Ready to Code and how her library made this a priority as they designed and facilitated coding classes for youth. Increased engagement leads to increased understanding and support for the project and achieves buy-in from staff, library administration and the community as a whole.

    Resource Type:
    Ready to Code examples
  • Binary Bracelets is a fun activity for younger teens that teaches them how to make bracelets using binary code. Participants are introduced to the concept of binary code and then they participate in a hands on activity to help them understand this concept of computational thinking.

    Resource Type:
    Lesson plans & activities
  • These pre-and post- surveys for a coding club program give youth the chance to consider their knowledge and skill in coding and reflect on their interest in coding and careers in computer science.

    Resource Type:
    Program evaluation & assessment
  • Five step-by-step lesson plans focusing on connecting youth interest in music to Scratch activities. Activities include creating a DJ mix, writing a song, and developing an animated dance routine.

    Resource Type:
    Lesson plans & activities
  • Limited available staff is a reality for most libraries, resulting in very real challenges for starting new programs in new content areas. When the Normal (IL) Public Library (NPL) began planning computational thinking (CT) activities we asked ourselves, What do you do to meet your community need when your in-house toolkit lacks necessary resources like computer science (CS) & CT knowledge, available staff, and time?

    Resource Type:
    Strategies, Ready to Code examples
  • Beanz is a bi-monthly magazine for kids about coding and computer science. News items and instructions for DIY projects will capture the attention of young people, both experienced coders and kids with a casual interest.

    Resource Type:
    Books & magazines
  • Be Internet Awesome teaches kids the fundamentals of digital citizenship and online safety so they can explore the online world with confidence.

    Resource Type:
    Lesson plans & activities
Sponsored by Google.