Resource Results:

Showing results 1 - 14 for
  • Free, easy-to-use activities and curriculum introduce students ages 9-14 to computer science through themed projects that attract students with varied interests. Instructional videos guide students through each activity, so no coding experience is needed to teach!

    Resource Type:
    Lesson plans & activities
  • This program is based on Google’s CS First Music & Sound club curriculum and has been customized by Homer (AK) Public Library for a week-long coding camp to introduced kids ages 8-11 to basic computer science concepts while they create digital music, sound and video. Library staff worked with a music educator to deliver the program content.

    Resource Type:
    Lesson plans & activities
  • Two characters meet in a world and discover a surprising object. What happens next? It’s all up to students, who have the opportunity to use their imagination and creativity to code their own story.

    Resource Type:
    Lesson plans & activities
  • This self-paced course helps educators learn about computational thinking and how it can be integrated into a variety of subject areas. Divided into five units, the course provides real world examples as well as supplemental readings to support your learning.

    Resource Type:
    Professional development, Tutorial, Website
  • Engaging, video-based lessons that teach digital skills through immediate, real-life applications and project-based curriculum.

    Resource Type:
    Lesson plans & activities
  • This article serves as a guide to what Finland is doing to innovate their curriculum and prepare their students for a changing world.

    Resource Type:
    Books & magazines, Professional development
  • In this video, see how Kent County Middle School students developed projects for their community. After interviewing local businesses and community organizations, students learn applied coding and computational thinking by developing the projects to meet the individual needs of the business or community organization.

    Resource Type:
    Ready to Code examples
  • This online textbook covers many of the topics central to the ideas libraries need to embrace when supporting and providing computational thinking activities. Chapters topics include connected learning, design thinking, how children learn, and developing learning assessments.

    Resource Type:
    Strategies, Professional development
  • Workforce development conversations and concerns about the readiness of today’s students for tomorrow’s IT field often focus on schools. Libraries, however, can play a vital role in connecting youth to computer science (CS) and computational thinking (CT) opportunities and connections for learning across time and place. How can libraries establish their role as an anchor and broker in the community for youth CT learning?

    Resource Type:
    Strategies, Ready to Code examples
  • A webcast highlighting free materials and information for attracting more girls and underrepresented groups to computing and information technology.

    Resource Type:
    Strategies, Professional development
  • Developed by the Creative Communities Research Group at the University of Colorado Boulder, Family Creative Learning is a workshop series that engages children and their parents to learn together — as designers and inventors — through the use of creative technologies.

    Resource Type:
    Lesson plans & activities, Professional development
  • Video host Cathleen Clifford sits down with Groton (Conn.) Public Library Librarian Emily Sheehan and Teen Services Librarian Jessa Franco to discuss how they are using the Libraries Ready to Code grant to teach coding skills to teens in their Hacker Club, who then teach those skills to younger students.

    Resource Type:
    Ready to Code examples
  • An overview of what computational thinking (CT) is and why it is important for libraries to add computational thinking activities to services for all ages.

    Resource Type:
    Professional development
  • While families with preschoolers have established times they visit the library, for example for weekly story hour, it is challenging to bring in these families for other programming. This is particularly true for topic areas that may be unfamiliar or unrecognized as connected to valuable preschool and early education literacies. How can we engage preschool learners and their families in quality computational thinking (CT)activities appropriate for that age group?

    Resource Type:
    Strategies, Ready to Code examples
Sponsored by Google.