In Finland, Kids Learn Computer Science without Computers

This article serves as a guide to what Finland is doing to innovate their curriculum and prepare their students for a changing world.

This article provides examples that educators could use with their students such as the concept of a loop dance in physical-education classes, knitting in art class, as well as the foundation ideal that specific outcomes require particular instructions in a particular order when storytelling, The value of this resource comes in its no-cost programming and activities that other types of educators could use to help young children develop these fundamental skills. It goes into brief detail about the importance of teaching these skills and drives home the fact that, “because programming can be taught in so many ways, it can be an opportunity for kids to learn a lot of related skills, such as how to collaborate, how to tell a story, and how to think creatively”. All of the ideas listed in the article could go on to be great no-cost library programs.

Audience: 
Upper elementary (3-5)
Middle school (6-8)
Learner Experience w/ CS & CT: 
Beginner
Some Practice
Experienced
Facilitator Type: 
Library staff member
Facilitator Experience w/ CS & CT: 
Beginner
Some Practice
Experienced
Type of Library: 
Public
School
Tribal
Special
Library Location Type: 
Rural
Suburban
Urban
Size: 
Very small (< 300 students, < 10k population)
Small (< 500 students, < 24k population)
Medium (< 750 students, < 99k population)
Large (< 1000 students, < 500k population)
Very large (1000+ students, 500k+ population)
Topic: 
English & language arts
Performing arts
Unplugged
Visual arts
Requirements: 
Technology not required
No cost
Resource Type: 
Books & magazines
Professional development
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